Tag Archive | language teaching

BCTEAL 2014 Lower Mainland Conference

2014 BC TEAL Lower Mainland Regional Conference – Online Registration Deadline – November 19th

 The 2014 Lower Mainland Regional Conference will be held on Saturday, November 22nd, at Vancouver English Centre (VEC). The Conference’s theme is “Celebrating Learner’s Success.” It will feature the panel plenary presentation in which the EAL learners from various sectors will be sharing their success stories.

For more information on the conference, visit BCTEAL website at:

http://www.bcteal.org/conferences/2014-lm-regional-conference

Any member of the ETEA wishing to attend the Regional Conference, should contact the ETEA PD Committee Chair, Marina Sokolova, at eteapd.newsletter@gmail.com to obtain a promotional code to receive an additional discount.

 

For more information on ETEA PD events and registration for BCTEAL/TESL Canada Conferences, visit this site ETEA PD Committee .

 

 

SUBTLE – A Suggestion for Reflection

Michael, Oct 12

A desire to teach can be motivated by many factors; compassion, a desire to serve,  to share, or to dispense knowledge, as well as to achieve status, power over others, a safe job, great holidays or good pay. All the reasons in this panoply of factors, may appear to go from positive to negative, however, in my view they are all the antithesis of the way a teacher should be motivated.

When teachers are “doing teaching” with these attitudes, they are attached to the students emotionally, not professionally. Students come to learn what they need to take them forward, not to connect emotionally with the teacher. Any connection that is emotional should come naturally as a consequence of the learning. Creating a learning environment is a teacher’s job; the only job.

In order to illustrate my point, I will share an anecdote from my student teacher internship: My supervisor, a master of cornering students on the truth, asked me, after a week of my teaching a Grade 4/5 class, how I was experiencing the work. I waxed enthusiastic, declaring how amazing it was, and satisfying, that I felt better and had more energy at the end of the day than I did at the beginning! Looking at me carefully he said, “So, you are a parasite?” Shocked and hurt, I replied,”Why did you say that?” He answered me with, Well, you are sucking the energy out of the students aren’t you? As he walked away, the epiphany occurred wherein I understood the message he had been drilling in to us all year: Give the students what they need, not what you want to give them. It’s not about you; it’s about the learning that is occurring.

Have some fun reflecting on that.

How is your learning environment?

How are you attached to the students?

How can you avoid attachment?

Next week – How do you know what the students need?

POINT OF VIEW

THINKING ABOUT CURRICULUM
ILSC has always been known as a highly creative and innovative cohort of teachers who strive to make their classes relevant and student-centered.
However, recently, with the changes in the Corporate Management and the Administration, there have been sweeping changes in several programs, particularly, Academic Preparation, towards formal, top-down managerial style, which focuses on standardized testing and testing in general as nearly the solely way of assessment of students’ work. The Administration has been trying to defend these changes by claiming that the new Assessment Tool provides more consistency for the teachers and ensures more uniformity among the students’ “levels,” especially for the students wishing to transfer to the University Pathway program. Although some teachers agree that, in theory, using one Standardized Test gives them more consistency, the majority believe that, in practice, this way of assessment is irrelevant and causes them to “teach to the test.” This move continues to cause the teachers’ indignation because it stifles their creativity and forbids much of the flexibility with the content and approach for the sake of one test. In the system like this, students are expected to absorb various facts about the language like sponges, and, within a little over three weeks, regurgitate them on one uniform test while demonstrating uniform improvement in their skills, akin robots. The students’ existing needs and abilities, their increasingly varying learning styles, the connections between teachers and students, and any other human factor are completely ignored, while the teachers are still expected to inspire and motivate, to instill the love of the language in the students, and to prepare the students for the real world. What kinds of Standardized Tests await them in the future?

STANDARDIZED VS STUDENT CENTRED CURRICULUM : SURVEY

I have prepared the survey concerning the above issues and have already sent it to eight teachers. Five teachers, mostly from ILSC, have responded with very poignant comments and useful suggestions. Some results are seen in the following screenshots:
Want to participate? You are strongly encouraged!
Click on the link to access the survey:

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/JDGXTB2

The new results will be published here.

NEXT:  MORE THINKING ABOUT CURRICULUM

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